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Publications


To download a paper, please click on the thumbnail below each abstract.

For an up-to-date record please check my profiles at Google Scholar.


How To Identify Questionnaires

For Mixed Reality Applications

Pejman Saeghe

Proceedings of the British HCI Conference 2021, Workshop on
Beyond Questionnaires: Innovative Evaluation Methods for Mixed Reality

London, UK, July 2021

After decades of mixed reality (MR) research, researchers’ choice of MR-related questionnaires remains limited. A majority of questionnaires used by the community were originally developed for other media platforms. The application of such questionnaires in the context of MR risks undermining the validity of results. In this paper, we propose a method to map both MR and non-MR applications to a shared space to allow using questionnaires from similar non-MR applications as a starting point in the context of investigating their MR counterparts. We identify productivity-entertainment and passive-interactive spectra as two useful dimensions that cut across both MR and non-MR application areas, and combine them to create a 2-dimensional space. The idea is to find where in this space the MR application at hand fits, find its nearest non-MR neighbour, and use the questionnaire(s) targeted at the latter for the MR application under investigation. This approach has the potential to systematise questionnaire selection which in turn can make between-study comparisons more meaningful. We further suggest that research is required to develop new questionnaires that measure meaningful aspects of emerging MR experiences.

Figure 1: A 2D mapping space constructed by combining passive-interactive and productivity-entertainment dimen- sions. A few illustrative application areas and content types have been used for illustration.

Remote XR Studies: The Golden Future of HCI Research?

Florian Mathis, Xuesong Zhang, Joseph O’Hagan, Daniel Medeiros, Pejman Saeghe, Mark McGill, Stephen Brewster, Mohamed Khamis

Proceedings of the CHI 2021 Workshop on XR Remote Research

Yokohama, Japan, May 2021

While extended reality (XR) research usually takes place in a con- trolled lab setting, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced many re- searchers to move their research out of the lab and conduct so called “Remote XR Research”. Our position for the workshop is two-fold: First, there is a need to define what the term “Remote XR Research” means and identify the key challenges in validating remote XR research as a methodology. This enables researchers to understand the advantages (e.g., better representation of demographics, re- mote in-situ experiments) and the potential pitfalls of this research method for HCI research. Second, remote XR research (however it is defined) can be particularly helpful in situations where researchers aim to study real-world systems or user behaviour that are usually challenging to study or require a significant amount of effort and resources. Remote XR studies can and should, if the research question(s) and research aim(s) allow it, be applied to different fields of human-centred research, especially during times where face-to-face user studies are prohibited.


Conceptualizing Augmented Reality Television
for the Living Room

Radu-Daniel Vatavu, Pejman Saeghe, Teresa Chambel, Vinoba Vinayagamoorthy, Marian Florin Ursu

In Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Media Experiences

Barcelona, Spain, June 2020

We examine the concept and characteristics of “Augmented Reality Television” (ARTV) using a four-step investigation method consisting of (1) an analysis of commonly-accepted perspectives on Augmented and Mixed Reality systems, (2) a literature survey of previous work on ARTV, (3) relevant connections with other areas of scientific investigation from TVX/IMX, such as Ambient Media, Interactive TV, and 3-D TV, and (4) by proposing a conceptual framework for ARTV called the “Augmented Reality Television Continuum”. Our work comes at a moment when the excitement and hype about the potential of AR for home entertainment has overlooked rigorous analysis and clear-cut examinations of the concepts involved, which should be the hallmark of any exact science. With this work, our goal is to draw the community’s attention toward fundamentals and first principles of ARTV and to tease out its salient qualities on solid foundations.

Conceptualizing Augmented Reality Television for the Living Room

Augmented Reality and Television:
Dimensions and Themes

Pejman Saeghe, Gavin Abercrombie, Bruce Weir, Sarah Clinch, Steve Pettifer, Robert Stevens

In Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Media Experiences

Barcelona, Spain, June 2020

Commercialisation of augmented reality (AR) devices has led to their growing application in domestic environments and leisure activities. One such domain is that of television, where AR is one of several technologies driving innovation (c.f. Internet broadcasting, second screen devices). We conduct a systematic literature review to quantify research at the intersection of AR and broadcast television. We identify six common themes and a set of cross-cutting design decisions. We distill this information into a design space incorporating six dimensions: abstraction, interaction, time, display, context and editorial control. We provide methods to operationalise the dimensions to enable research and development of novel concepts, and through this generate six design guidelines to shape future activity at the intersection of AR and television.

Augmented Reality and Television: Dimensions and Themes

Designing Intergenerational Media Experiences:
A Participatory Design Approach

Veronica Pialorsi, Pejman Saeghe

In Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Media Experiences workshop
Toys and the TV: Serious Play

Barcelona, Spain, June 2020

The advent of new technologies and platforms (e.g. hand-held displays, the Internet) challenge the traditional ways in which we consume media content. The differences in the technological literacy of young children (digital natives) and elderly adults, can deny them opportunities to bond over shared media experiences. However, if designed thoughtfully, novel media experiences can bridge this intergenerational gap. We provide a scenario where connected toys encourage collaborative learning, and create a bonding experience between a grandchild and their grandparent. Furthermore, we propose a set of methods to be used in participatory design for the creation of such experiences.

first page of workshop paper for Toys and the TV, published at the ACM IMX2020 conference.

Augmenting Television With Augmented Reality

Pejman Saeghe, Sarah Clinch, Bruce Weir, Maxine Glancy,
Vinoba Vinayagamoorthy, Ollie Pattinson, Steve Pettifer, Robert Stevens

In Proceedings of the ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for TV and Online Video

Manchester, UK, June 2019

This paper explores the effects of adding augmented reality (AR) artefacts to an existing TV programme. A prototype was implemented augmenting a popular nature documentary. Synchronised content was delivered over a Microsoft HoloLens and a TV. Our preliminary findings suggest that the addition of AR to an existing TV programme can result in creation of engaging experiences. However, presenting content outside the traditional TV window challenges traditional storytelling conventions and viewer expectations. Further research is required to understand the risks and opportunities presented when adding AR artefacts to TV.

Image of the first page for an article published In Proceedings of the 2019 ACM International Conference on Interactive Experiences for TV and Online Video

Augmented Reality Broadcasting:
Challenges and Opportunities

Pejman Saeghe, Sarah Clinch, Bruce Weir, Steve Pettifer, Robert Stevens

In Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) workshop
Challenges Using Head-Mounted Displays in Shared and Social Spaces

Glasgow, Scotland, UK, May 2019

The constant evolution of technologies involved in the production, distribution, and consumption of broadcast material has impacted our perception of our societies and the way we interact with each other. Future changes in this landscape will be carried forward by advances in high speed mobile connectivity, and the sensing and awareness properties of virtual and augmented reality devices. In this paper we present a vision for a use-case of these emerging technologies in the context of a scenario, and discuss the social and technological challenges they present.

Image of the first page for an article published in Proceedings of the CHI 2019 Workshop on Challenges Using Head-Mounted Displays in Shared and Social Spaces Glasgow, Scotland, UK, May 2019 (CHI 2019)

Automatic Bilingual Corpus Collection from Wikipedia

Mark Unitt, Simon Tite, Pejman Saeghe

In Proceedings of the 38th Conference Translating and the Computer

London, UK, November 2016

This is a study to combine a number of existing technologies with newly developed tools to create an automatic tool to assist with corpus collection for machine translation. This study aims to combine technologies for domain classification, domain source identification, and comparable file alignment into a unified tool. The unified tool will be used to make the corpora collection process more focused and efficient and enable a wider variety of sources to be used.

Automatic Bilingual Corpus Collection from Wikipedia